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Considering India's notable in thesector, has ranked the country at fifth place on a list of 30 countries on in the renewable energy space. The ranking done by Bloomberg New Energy Finance's annual report indicates that clean energy's centre of gravity is shifting from developed to developing countries. The report ranked China in the first place, followed by Chile, Brazil, South Africa and India.

The report said: "The new policy ambitions from the (Narendra) Modi government signal clean energy opportunities in the country." The strongest parameter in favour of India was value chain, while lower-than-expected investment continues to be the weak link.

As became more cost-competitive in emerging markets in 2014, there would be a surge of investment and capacity-building in the Asian countries, especially China and India, the report noted. Last year, India added 5 gigawatt (Gw) of clean energy generation capacity.

 

 

CLEAN BREAK IN RENEWABLE SPACE
  • $343.2 billion Total clean energy investments (2009-14) in China
     
  • $52.5 billion Total clean energy investments (2009-14) in India
     
  • 262.5 Gw Installed power capacity
     
  • 38,360 Mw Total renewable energy capacity
     
  • 5,009 Mw Renewable capacity added in 2014
     
  • 14.6% Renewable share in total installed capacity
Top Indian states: Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Rajasthan & Gujarat


"Major reforms in India brought by the Modi administration bring hope of quicker deployment for the country's eager renewable energy developers," said Climatescope.

Among the states, Tamil Nadu led the pack with the highest wind energy capacity, followed by Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

Madhya Pradesh scored the highest among Indian states on growth rate of clean energy investments. The state's favourable land policy and easy clearances have resulted in attracting projects. Gujarat, which was once a haven of clean energy investments, slipped from the top slot due to policy uncertainty and litigation over tariff.

Maharashtra's high feed-in tariff led to a surge in wind capacity.

The report noted: "Maharashtra has done relatively little to encourage private investment in solar; it has held no tenders for power contracts and offers no feed-in tariffs."

Renewable energy in Rajasthan at 4 Gw represents a high share (32 per cent) of total power capacity of 13 Gw, compared to other states. "The overall renewable energy capacity grew 14 per cent in 2014 in the state, but it has done little policy-wise to encourage solar development through incentives and the state's distribution utilities are among the financially shakiest in India," said the report.

At 7.4 Gw, Tamil Nadu has more wind installed than any other state. Since 2012, however, annual new-build rates have fallen and in 2014, only 208 megawatt was commissioned. This is largely due to the poor financial health of state-owned distribution utility companies and occasional payment delays to power project owners.

The Indian government's goal of providing round-the-clock power to 1.25 billion citizens has triggered huge interest from investors. The report noted that a strong energy minister overseeing coal, power, and new and renewable energy sectors could have a positive influence.

The Modi-led government has revised the targets for renewable energy to 175 Gw by 2022.

Source: Business Standard

Indo-UK Healthcare, a consortium of Indo-British promoters, has coIndo-UK Healthcare, a consortium of Indo-British promoters, has committed to invest over Rs 10,000 crore to bring the famed NHSHospitals of England, apart from other leading English educational institutions and universities into the country over the next few years.

 

The initiative is supported by Healthcare UK, a joint initiative of the British department of health, UK Trade and Investment and the National Health Service (NHS) England.

 

Under the agreement signed in the presence of visiting Prime MinisterNarendra Modi and his host David Cameron, the first hospital, King’s College Hospital, England will come up in New Chandigarh at an investment of 100 million pounds or Rs 1,000 crore, a statement from Indo-UK Healthcare said.Indo-UK Healthcare, a consortium of Indo-British promoters, has committed to invest over Rs 10,000 crore to bring the famed NHS Hospitals of England, apart from other leading English educational institutions and universities into the country over the next few years.

 

The initiative is supported by Healthcare UK, a joint initiative of the British department of health, UK Trade and Investment and the National Health Service (NHS) England.

 

Under the agreement signed in the presence of visiting Prime MinisterNarendra Modi and his host David Cameron, the first hospital, King’s College Hospital, England will come up in New Chandigarh at an investment of 100 million pounds or Rs 1,000 crore, a statement from Indo-UK Healthcare said.mmitted to invest over Rs 10,000 crore to bring the famed NHS Hospitals of England, apart from other leading English educational institutions and universities into the country over the next few years.

 

The initiative is supported by Healthcare UK, a joint initiative of the British department of health, UK Trade and Investment and the National Health Service (NHS) England.

 

Under the agreement signed in the presence of visiting Prime MinisterNarendra Modi and his host David Cameron, the first hospital, King’s College Hospital, England will come up in New Chandigarh at an investment of 100 million pounds or Rs 1,000 crore, a statement from Indo-UK Healthcare said.

 

However, it did not say when the first hospital will become functional.

 

“Each of the 11 Indo-UK Institutes of Health will entail a foreign direct investment of around Rs 1,000 crore across 11 states and will include multispecialty NHS-branded hospital for healthcare delivery, clinical support services, NHS e-health, staff accommodation, a medical college, a nursing college, R&D facilities, medical manufacturing facilities and a medical mall,” the statement added.

 

The project, once completed, will employ 5,000 doctors and 25,000 nurses, allied health specialists for the 11,000 beds.

 

The project has the potential of creating upwards of 1,00,000 jobs.

 

The medical and nursing colleges will train 15,000 new MBBS doctors and 20,000 nurses, it added.

 

Funds for the project will be raised through a combination of debt and equity from a consortium of banks, including UK Export Finance and leading private equity players including Elara Capital.

 

Elara Capital shall be acting as sole advisor for raising funds for these projects.

 

A memorandum of understanding has been signed between Indo-UK Healthcare and Shapoorji Pallonji to construct these 11 institutes of health.

 

The first of the Indo-UK Institutes of Health, King’s College Hospital will be set up in New Chandigarh, Punjab.

 

“This is the first of a proposed eleven new Indo-UK Institutes for Health that will be developed across 11 states. When fully implemented, they would amount to 1 billion pounds in investment into the country’s healthcare system, accompanied by strategic clinical and training partnerships with the finest NHS organisations, universities and private sector companies,” the statement said.

 

Source:- Times of India

India aims to scale up start-ups in the biotechnology sector to at least 1,500 in the next two to three years to boost technological interventions in the health and agriculture sectors, a senior biotechnology department official said.

 

“We presently have around 500 start-ups in the biotech sector. It is less in comparison with other sectors. We plan to scale it up to 1,500 to 2,000 in the next two to three years,” said Renu Swarup, department of biotechnology’s senior adviser and managing director of the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC).

 

She pointed out that there was a growing market for biotech products and services given India’s population and its needs.

 

Biotech start-ups are into bio-pharma (diagnostics and therapeutics), agricultural (biofertilisers, hybrid seeds etc.), bioinformatics and drug development, etc.

 

“They are directly or indirectly linked to the health and agricultural sectors,” Swarup told IANS.

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi earlier this year announced a ‘Start-up India, Stand up India’ campaign to promote bank financing for start-ups and offer incentives to boost entrepreneurship and job creation.

 

“Under the new initiative, if we can create a favourable business environment, we can tap into our own products and know-how for solutions in health and agriculture,” she said.

 

It would also help researchers to become ‘tech-preneurs’.

 

“We have seen good interventions happening in Odisha and Tamil Nadu,” said Swarup.

 

The Indian biotech industry holds about two percent share of the global biotech sector. At present India is ranked 12th in the world in the biotech sector and third in the Asia-Pacific region.

 

By 2017, the size of India’s biotech industry is estimated to increase to $11.6 billion from $4.3 billion in 2012.

 

Indian biotech entrepreneur Kiran Majumdar Shaw has said that the emergence of biotech start-ups is resulting in a reverse brain drain.

 

Currently, Swarup said, new products have emerged from the Grand Challenges India (GCI) Interventions. The GCI was jointly launched by BIRAC under the department of biotechnology and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2013.

 

“These include improved sanitation technologies and bio-digester designs. Initially, they will be showcased as demonstrations on a large scale and subsequently introduced in the market,” she said.

 

Source:Economic Times

A look at the various deals struck between India and United Kingdom during Modi’s visit.
 
 
 
1. UK listed OPG Power Ventures plc will add to its existing investment in India by £2.9 billion to a total of £3.4 billion, creating around 100 UK jobs over next few years. The investment will create 4200 MW of new power capacity in India, of which 1000 MW will be solar power and 3200 MW will be thermal and renewable power in Tamil Nadu
 

 

2. King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Indo UK Healthcare have signed a pact to open King’s College Hospital, Chandigarh, which will lead to the creation of jobs for 2,500 nurses and 500 doctors

 

3. Merlin Entertainments plc has announced its first business in India — a Madame Tussauds wax attraction scheduled to open in New Delhi in early 2017. Merlin is also looking to roll out several more of its ‘Midway’ attraction brands such as Sea Life and Legoland Discovery Centres in key cities across India, and expects to invest up to £50 million there over the next ten years

 

4. Genus ABS will invest £1 million in India, providing latest dairy genetics and constructing a state-of-the-art facility near Pune

 

5. Solar PV generator in the UK and Europe, Lightsource, has announced a £2 billion investment in India. It will design, install and manage around 3 gigawatts of solar power infrastructure in India over the next 5 years

 

6. The UK’s Kloudpad Mobility Research Ltd has announced a £100 million investment in South India to ‘Make in India’ the next generation of smart watches, wearables and tablets, creating 2,500 skilled jobs in India and supporting 50 highly skilled researchers in the UK

 

7. Vodafone has announced a range of further investments in India totalling £1.3 billion (Rs 13,000 crore) to support the Government of India’s ‘Digital India’ and ‘Make in India’ campaigns

 

8. Representatives of the UK’s insurance industry with JVs in India have announced a number of agreements to increase their FDI in the country. For example, should their applications for regulatory approval be granted, Standard Life, Bupa and Aviva have committed to invest a combined total of £238 million of FDI in their Indian joint ventures

 

9. E-commerce cloud platform provider, cloudBuy, is signing a contract with the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) for an online business to business marketplace

 

10. UK technology company Intelligent Energy recently signed an agreement to acquire the energy management business of Indian firm GTL. It will provide clean energy to 27,400 telecoms towers in India, with a contract value of £1.2 billion over ten years

 

11. Holland & Barrett International has partnered with Apollo Hospitals in a deal worth £20 million. The partnership will open 1,000 Holland & Barrett outlets in India over the next 5 years. The first store will open in New Delhi in January 2016

 

12. Indiabulls Housing Finance Limited has invested £66 million into OakNorth Bank Limited, a recently authorised bank providing lending to UK entrepreneurs and small business owners

 

13. SSPSL, a subsidiary of India’s Strides Shasun will announce an £8 million investment in its England based facility

 

14. Advatech Health Care will invest £5 million in the UK and introduce ‘disruptive’ IT technology to ambulances

 

15. TVS is opening £20 million advanced logistics facility in Barnsley generating 100 new jobs, growing to 500 over 5 years, in addition to 50 jobs being created through market growth

 

16. Indian learning solutions provider Dexler is setting up Dexler Education UK with investments of around £10 million

 

17. London Stock Exchange Group and Yes Bank are signing an MoU to foster collaborations on bond and equity issuance, with a focus on Green Infrastructure Finance

 

18. HDFC will issue rupee denominated bonds overseas up to $750 million under the RBI guidelines, in one or more tranches. It will list the initial issue of bonds for trading on the London Stock Exchange

 

19. Bharti Airtel intends issuing its maiden sterling bond of up to £500 million to be listed on the London Stock Exchange

 

20. State Bank of India and London Stock Exchange Group to collaborate to create the ‘FTSE-SBI India Bonds Indices’ which will be used initially by a new investment fund run by SBI

 

21. The offshore arm of the UK’s Equiniti Group, Equiniti India announced its expansion plan in Chennai that will create 500 new jobs by end of 2017

 

22. Zyfin and Sun Global will be listing the world’s first India fixed income ETF on the London Stock Exchange

 

23. SBI UK will open two branches in Hounslow and Ilford and expand of its Manchester and Leicester branches

 

24. Wipro has increased its investment in the UK with the opening of its newest office for Wipro Digital

 

25. TCS, with British Council, will provide opportunities for 1,000 graduate interns from British universities to train and work in India over the next five years

 

26. HSBC has announced the launch of its ‘Skills for Life’ initiative in India, a programme to skill 75,000 disadvantaged young people and women over five years

 

27. MoU between the two countries on tech cooperation in the rail sector

 

Source:- The Indian Express

At 108 out of 145 countries, India’s ranking in the global gender index, compiled every year by the World Economic Forum (WEF), has climbed six places, primarily on account of political representation, but continues to be abysmal on the economic and health fronts.

India’s improved overall ranking (up from 114 of the 142 countries examined last year) reflects the fact that there are more women in positions of political leadership, particularly ministers and members of Parliament. With the number of women ministers jumping from 9% to 22% of the cabinet, India ranks among the most improved countries in the region in terms of political representation.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s cabinet has six women ministers, including in the key portfolio of external affairs. The 16th Lok Sabha also saw a rise in the number of women parliamentarians from 11.4% to 12.15%.

That’s the good news.

Equally, there are many causes for concern.

India fell five places in terms of women in the workforce to hit nearly the bottom of the rankings at 139 of 145 countries, its worst rank in this category since 2006.

Indian women have also regressed in terms of health and survival, placed at a lowly 143 out of 145. India is one of the three countries that have declined the furthest on the health and survival sub-index, the other two being China and Albania.

The WEF’s assessment of India’s ranking in terms of sex ratio at birth (143), a sub-indicator in the health and survival category, is unchanged from last year and is ahead only of China and Armenia.

On educational attainment—a fourth parameter in the overall gender index after political representation, economy and health—India has improved marginally, going up one place from 126 in 2014 to 125 this year.

The report said the female to male ratio in India’s labour force participation is 0.35 now against 0.36 last year. Income disparity is also high, with women earning an estimated average of $2,257 per year, compared with $9,175 for men. While South Africa has narrowed its labour force participation gap by 18% and Japan by 11%, in India, the gap has widened by 7%.

Overall, India’s fall in rank is not only relative to other countries, it also marks a decline in absolute terms—the gap is wider today than 10 years ago.

Ironically, even as India’s gender ranking in education reflects an improvement—119 in primary education enrolment, 118 for secondary and 104 for tertiary education—women continue to be missing from the workforce.

At 53 percentage points, India has one of the worst gender gaps in the world when it comes to labour force participation, 2015 World Bank data shows. Not only other countries in the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa) grouping, but other emerging economies in Asia such as Indonesia fare much better than India when it comes to employing women, according to the World Bank data.

India’s female labour force participation rate fell nearly seven percentage points to 22.5% between 2004-05 and 2011-12, according to India’s NSSO data (http://bit.ly/1jenLeB), Mint reported in November 2013.

In a paper titled Labour Force Participation of Women in India: Some Facts, Some Queries, published by the London School of Economics’ Asia Research Centre, Surjit Bhalla and Ravinder Kaur point out that discrimination against women, starting from practices such as sex-selective abortion, is a possible reason for poor participation of women in the workforce.

In addition, the lack of safety and supporting infrastructure plays a role in deterring many educated, urban women from pursuing careers.

“India is a very peculiar case where despite increases in incomes and the economy, female labour-force participation has declined. Barring a few metros and some companies, workspaces are not women-friendly. Lack of safety and infrastructural issues have been reasons why women are staying away,” said Shamika Ravi, a fellow at Brookings India, a think tank.

Some have questioned the WEF’s methodology, which they say is anomalous because it looks at political empowerment through representation even though Parliament itself has failed for 20 years to pass a bill seeking to reserve 33% parliamentary seats for women.

“I am not sure how much weightage can be given to having a female prime minister or president as there is no direct link with women in power and feminist notions of empowerment,” said Mary E. John, senior fellow and associate professor, Centre for Women’s Development Studies at Delhi University.

Globally, the gender gap has closed by 4% in the 10 years since WEF began measuring the global gender gap in 2006.

The economic gap has closed only by 3% with wage equality and labour force parity stalling from 2009-10.

The WEF estimates that at this rate, the economic gender gap worldwide will not be bridged until 2033.

As with India, globally, too, the area where the most progress has been made over the past decade is political representation.

For 2015, the top 10 ranked countries in terms of gender include the Scandinavian trio of Iceland, Finland and Norway.

One African country, Rwanda, comes in at No 7 and an Asian country, the Philippines ranks 9.

The Asia-Pacific top 10 include two South Asian countries—Bangladesh at 64 and Sri Lanka at 84.

 

Source: Livemint